The Subversive Thread

Discussion in 'Ideas' started by jjl, Jan 15, 2015.

  1. jjl

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    Subversive ideas and a place to shine a light on injustice.
     
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  2. jjl

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    Police Are Illegally Arresting Thousands of People For Not Repaying Payday Loans

    Payday businesses unlawfully file over 1,500 criminal complaints against those who have borrowed from them, and police are complicit in these false reports and arrests.

    Texas Appleseed, a nonprofit organization that describes itself as “helping vulnerable Texans for the
    past 19 years” says that they have documented so many abuses by payday lenders and cops that they had no choice but to recently file a complaint with state and federal regulators of the payday loan industry.


    Still, Texan cops have been complicit in these illegal and unconstitutional arrests and imprisonments.

    Read the complaint here and help us SPREAD THE WORD so these corrupted and complicit criminal cops don’t continue to get away with this!


    (Article by Jackson Marciana)
     
  3. jjl

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    Who Are Police Killing?

    Mike Males
    Published: August 26, 2014

    [​IMG]
    Rate of law enforcement killings, per million population per year, 1999-2011.

    Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics.

    While recent killings by police in Ferguson, Missouri, and New York City receive national attention, the fact is that from 1999 through 2011, American law enforcement officers killed 4,531 people, 96 percent by firearms and 96 percent of them men, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.* The rate of police killings of African Americans has fallen by 70 percent over the last 40-50 years, but their risk remains much higher than that of Whites, Latinos, and Asians.

    The five states or jurisdictions where a person is most likely to be killed by law enforcement are New Mexico, Nevada, District of Columbia, Oregon, and Maryland. California ranks sixth from the top. Alabama, North Carolina, New Jersey, Massachusetts, and New York are the safest (or, perhaps, the worst at reporting).

    The major counties and urban jurisdictions with the highest rates of law enforcement killings are Wyandotte County (Kansas City); Denver County, Baltimore (city), Norfolk (city), and Anderson County, South Carolina; interestingly, Harris County (Houston) has the lowest reported rate. Fresno, Riverside, Kern, San Bernardino, and San Diego have the highest rates in California; Contra Costa has the lowest.

    The racial group most likely to be killed by law enforcement is Native Americans, followed by African Americans, Latinos, Whites, and Asian Americans.

    Native Americans, 0.8 percent of the population, comprise 1.9 percent of police killings. African Americans, 13 percent of the population, are victims in 26 percent of police shootings. Law enforcement kills African Americans at 2.8 times the rate of white non-Latinos, and 4.3 times the rate of Asians.

    Latinos are victimized by police killings at a level 30 percent above average and 1.9 times the rate of White, non-Latinos.

    One-fourth of those killed by law enforcement are under age 25, 54 percent are ages 25-44, and nearly one-fourth are ages 45 and older. Teenagers comprise only 7 percent of all police killings. The risk of an older teen age 15-19 being killed by police is about the same as for a 50 year-old; for a younger teen age 10-14, about the same as for an 80 year-old.

    [​IMG]
    Law enforcement killings per million population, annual average.

    Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics. Compressed Mortality File 1968-2011.

    While statistics are always suspect over time, killings by law enforcement officers appear to be much lower today than in the past. In the late 1960s, nearly 100 young black men under age 25 were killed by law enforcement every year. Even as the black youth and young adult population doubled over the last 40 years, police shootings of young black men fell to around 35 per year in the 2000s, a rate decline of 79 percent. While younger African Americans were the victims in 1 in 4 killings by police in the 1968-74 period and 1 in 7 in 1975-84, today, that proportion is 1 in 10.

    Similarly, police killings of African Americans 25 and older have declined by 61 percent since the late 1960s. Still, the rates for younger African Americans remain 4.5 times higher, and for older African Americans 1.7 times higher, than for other races and ages.

    *These are called “legal interventions,” defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as “injuries inflicted by the police or other law-enforcing agents . . . in the course of arresting or attempting to arrest lawbreakers, suppressing disturbances, maintaining order, and other legal action.
     
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  4. jjl

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    Natives Call for Attention to Police Killing of Paiute Corey Kanosh
    Christina Rose
    1/13/15
    A recentDepartment of Justicereport announced that as a percentage of the population, Natives are more likely than any other race to be shot by police. The Kanosh Band of Paiutes are calling for attention to the October 2012 shooting of Corey Kanosh, a 35-year-old Paiute man, who was shot by Millard County Deputy Dale Josse. Kanosh was the unarmed passenger in a car driven by his friend Dana Harnes, who is white. According to theMillard County Attorney’s investigation, Josse chased Kanosh some distance in the dark before calling for backup. Attorney Todd McFarlane said that may have been a decision that led to Kanosh’s death.

    According to Deputy County Attorney Pat Finlinson, the case against Deputy Josse was dismissed without prejudice. “There is a review letter declining prosecution,” he said. “I can tell you pretty consistently, right now I wouldn’t be able to comment because of pending civil litigation.”

    Kanosh’s case has not yet gone to court, but according to McFarlane, Kanosh was denied his constitutional rights when Josse and other officers neglected to provide medical attention for Kanosh after he was shot. “The constitutional right to life includes the right to prompt medical attention, especially when law enforcement is responsible for jeopardizing that right to life,” McFarlane said.

    In taped interviews, Emergency Medical Team members state they were called on site more than half an hour after Kanosh was shot. They were allowed to check for a pulse but not permitted to move him. The two team members agreed they did not feel a pulse, however they could not confirm that Kanosh was deceased. McFarlane said that an undetected weak pulse is not uncommon, and that Kanosh was left where he fell in the dirt until the following morning.

    In the sheriff’s report, the deputy admits he clearly saw that Harnes was driving the car and that Corey was the passenger. McFarlane wondered, “How do the police justify chasing the Native passenger versus the white driver? Corey was unarmed and had committed no crime.”



    [​IMG]
    Dana Harnes, the driver of the car, states the deputy’s car was following right behind them on the chase into the mountains. The Kanosh family and Attorney Todd McFarlane question Deputy Josse’s decision to go after Corey Kanosh, passenger, rather than the driver. (screen shot provided by Todd McFarlane)

    End of Part 1
     
  5. jjl

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    Part 2
    Recalling the evening of October 12, 2012, Millard County resident Dana Harnes, driver of the vehicle, spoke of an evening filled with too much beer and a car chase that ended with Kanosh’s death. Harnes was 21 years old at the time, and involved in a long-term relationship with Marlee Kanosh, Corey’s sister. Harnes had left work and was heading to Corey’s house in Marlee’s car. “We drank some beers and went out to cruise around and listen to some music. Me and Marlee were fighting because I was out drinking with the car.”

    The two returned to the reservation and Kanosh’s mother, Marlene Pikyavit, offered them her car instead. “We went to the gas station, got more beers, and got some gas,” Harnes recalled.

    Marlee noted, “My brother and Dana were intoxicated when they took my mother’s car. It’s a small community, and we were in fear of them being in an accident or hurting someone we know, so we called the sheriff’s deputy, and he was very kind and cooperative. He said, ‘Let’s make sure nothing happens in the community.’ After he left, he alerted the authorities that he was searching for a stolen vehicle,” she said.

    Harnes and Kanosh were on their way back to the reservation when they saw the red and blue lights of the police vehicle. “I floored it to try to get away and headed up past the reservation,” Harnes said. “I tried to make a left on the dirt road and spun out, losing control of the car; then we were facing the cop head on and I continued to drive past him.”

    Harnes said he was driving about 50 mph and was scared. “Corey directed me towards the reservation cemetery and the cop was right behind us. We went from the gravel to off-road terrain and then went up into the mountain. We were going so fast, hitting rocks, trying to stay on the road, and then the road disappeared and we hit the rocks and were stuck. Corey turned around and was trying to hide the beers. I ran out of the car, west towards the reservation and he ran east, towards the mountains.”

    “The ground was all rocks and trees,” Harnes remembered. “I was running and fell, and I heard the cop talking to Corey, and then the ground disappeared beneath me and I ended up in a ravine. I came up on the other side and heard two guns shots, and then I heard Corey scream. Looking at the road, there were red and blue lights as far as the eye could see, and I wondered why they were after us. My flight for life kicked in and I took off and ran as far as I could go.”

    Gari Lafferty, a neighbor and Kanosh relative, saw the mile-long line of police cars along Reservation Road from her home. “I live across the field from Corey’s mother’s home,” she said. “It was a cool October night and I had the window open. It was 30 to 40 minutes after the cops went into the foothills before all of the cops came. Within an hour after that, the reservation was flooded with highway patrol and they set up a perimeter around the reservation. I went to my sister’s house, and there was a SWAT team there, and the guy said, ‘You can’t come in.’ I asked, why; what was going on, and Corey’s mother told me Corey had been shot. Now it’s after 11, and I told my son, there’s an ambulance parked about a mile from my house, why haven’t they called it up for Corey? My cousins had gone up to the foothills and they were told to leave, and the first responders were already there. I thought, if one of them is hurt, why didn’t they offer any aid?”



    APahvant Postarticle states, “Millard County Sheriff’s Office personnel delayed the EMTs from evaluating Corey, and then said that he was already dead, so there was no need to provide medical attention, and instructed the EMTs not to attempt to resuscitate.”

    A while later, the sheriff came down and told the family that Corey had been killed. “I asked why he wasn’t rendered any aid, and they didn’t answer any of my questions,” Lafferty said. “After that came the helicopter with a spotlight, and it echoed off the mountains. You would have thought they were looking for a crazy murderer. The police officers were saying that Dana had a gun. They asked Marlene if Corey had any guns or weapons and Marlene said no. I told my son, why are all these cops here?”

    Harnes made his way to Corey’s house and found the door unlocked. Bleeding from the fall, his clothes ripped from the terrain and brush, Harnes lay down behind the couch for the night. “I was hearing quads, I guess, and a helicopter—lights were flashing in the window and I heard dogs. I was so freaked out, I thought they were coming to kill me,” he said. “At about 7 or 8 in the morning, the police were knocking at the windows and knocking down the doors. I sat up and they shined the light in my eyes and had a machine gun pointed at me. They said raise your f***ing hands and pulled me out of the door. The school bus went by when they had me on the ground, and I looked down the road and it was still lined with cars.”

    When Millard County Sheriff Robert Dekker was asked about the amount of force used against two men who had been drinking in a loaned, family member’s car, he responded, “They were called after they got out of the car and started to run. They were called to find the other subject.”

    Harnes said he was placed in solitary confinement for 11 days without any communication. During that time, he was not told what the charges were, and was denied access to his attorney. Eventually Harnes found out they had charged him with grand theft auto, “which they had to drop because we were given the car by Marlee’s mom. They got me with third degree felony evading police, and driving with a suspended license,” Harnes said.

    Sheriff Dekker said, “I think a lot has been misconstrued, so people can say what they want and our hands are tied with the real facts. It’s not a good situation for anybody and certainly not for the Kanosh family. They filed a lawsuit but it was withdrawn, but there is still time for them to file.”

    Marlee Kanosh hopes to raise money for legal fees usinggofundme.

    Activists have rallied for the Kanosh case through protests and aJustice For Corey Kanosh Facebook page. Musician Young Jibwe dedicated the song “What’s Going On” to Kanosh, calling for answers to the violence against Natives.


    Those who knew Kanosh remember him as a traditional pow wow dancer and the father of a newborn son, born just shortly before Kanosh’s death. Dana Harnes remembered, “We were buds. We camped together, fished together, had so many heart-to-hearts. That night we had the deepest conversation we’d ever had. He told me how much he appreciated me, how much our friendship meant to him. It was weird, like he knew what was going to happen.


    Activist Victor Puertas, Peruvian, has lived in Salt Lake City for 10 years, and said he has long been aware of racist attitudes. “You feel it, you experience it, most of the time it’s subtle. Utah is one of those states you don’t hear much about, but it is one place where police violence is happening. We want justice for the Kanosh family. They have been through a lot. There is a lot of tension between Natives and the police, who are almost all white.”

    Describing her brother, Marlee Kanosh said, “He had his troubles, a lot of us carry burdens in life and Corey’s were extreme, but we are all human. People bring up his past, but what happened to him had nothing to do with his past and did not justify the shooting. He was my brother, my mother’s son, a very traditional man passing down traditions of our people. His past doesn’t define who he was the night he was shot.”


    Read more athttp://indiancountrytodaymedianetwo...ion-police-killing-paiute-corey-kanosh-158671
     
  6. jjl

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    Bridgeport, CT — Officer Clive Higgins of the Bridgeport police department,was indicted in August for stomping a subdued man’s head and neck during an arrest. Higgins was accused of using unreasonable force during the course of Orlando Lopez-Soto’s arrest on May 20, 2011, in Beardley Park.

    Higgins, 49, was found not guilty Wednesday by a federal jury.

    “We respect the jury’s verdict and the criminal justice process,” the U.S. Attorney’s office said in a statement. “Our office will continue to prioritize civil rights investigations. We thank the FBI and the prosecutors for their hard work on this case.”

    When Higgins was first indicted in August, the US Attorney’s office put out this statement, “The use of unreasonable force during an arrest is not only a clear violation of an individual’s civil rights, but also gravely undermines the community’s trust in law enforcement.”

    Video of the incident surfaced nearly a year after the arrest which is when the family of Lopez-Soto filed a lawsuit against the department. With the compelling video showing three officers brutalizing an incapacitated Lopez-Soto, the city agreed to pay out $198,000.

    In November of 2013, a $10 million federal lawsuit was filed against the department claiming that the problem of brutality within the Bridgeport police department is systemic and police officials closed their eyes to a rampage by three rogue officers allowing them to leave a nearly two-year trail of abuse and brutality.

    In the video, the two officers, Elson Morales and Joseph Lawlor, can be seen kicking the victim repeatedly while he is on the ground. Higgins then arrives in his cruiser, gets out and appears to stomp the downed suspect around the head and neck.

    Morales and Lawlor pleaded guilty in June to misdemeanor civil rights charges stemming from the assault. As part of the plea deal, they agreed to resign from the police force.

    From what we can see in the video, the actions of Higgins differ very little from those of Morales and Lawlor. It seems as if Higgins’ actions were more sadistic, as Lopez-Soto was obviously no threat by the time Morales and Lawlor issued their beatings. This makes the force applied by Higgins after his arrival even more unreasonable.

    “I have no comment on today’s decision. But ultimately, it has no bearing on actions being taken by the Bridgeport Police Department,” police Chief Joseph L. Gaudett Jr. said in a statement.

    “Officer Higgins remains on administrative leave from the department. Disciplinary charges have been filed against him, and there is more than one case pending. Now that federal criminal proceedings have concluded, I encourage the Bridgeport Police Commission to continue its efforts to promptly conclude these proceedings against Officer Higgins.”

    After watching the video, what do you think? Were the actions of Higgins justified and reasonable considering the situation? What could the defense have said that made a jury think otherwise?

    Let us know in the comments below.


    Read more at http://thefreethoughtproject.com/co...omping-subdued-mans-face/#4dqzYjmujeFBr1f6.99
     
  7. jjl

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    This automated bot bought ten pills of ecstasy in the name of art

    An art collective in Switzerland has created an automated bot that delivers drugs — and a lot of other stuff — to their front door. The bot, "Random Darknet Shopper," was created by the !Mediengruppe Bitnik collective for an exhibition on the so-called darknet. Using a weekly budget of $100 in bitcoin, the bot trolls Agora and other Silk Road-like marketplaces and makes one randomized purchase. In November, it purchased 10 pills of ecstasy, as documented on the collective's website, though it's delivered less illicit items, as well: a pair of Diesel jeans, Lord of the Rings e-books, and a pair of Nike Air Yeezus 2 shoes. All items it purchased have been put on display at the Kunst Halle gallery in St. Gallen.

    The artists describe their work as a "live mail" art project that explores the darkest corners of the darknet. "We want to see what goods come out of the deep web," the artists tell FastCo Labs, "where they are sent from, how (and whether) they arrive. We want to find out how the goods are packaged to be concealed from the postal services."

    "WE HOPE TO CRITICALLY EVALUATE MASS SURVEILLANCE."

    Mediengruppe Bitnik has experimented with postal projects before. In 2013, they sent a package to WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange at the Ecuadorian embassy in London, replete with a hidden camera that recorded its entire journey through a peephole. Their current work has a precedent, as well. In 2012, Darius Kazemi created a "Random Shopper" bot that purchased items on Amazon. But directing their bot on sites like Agora, where anonymous sellers push contraband, presents more complicated questions of legality and trust.

    "By exploring the Darknet from an artistic viewpoint we hope to critically evaluate mass surveillance, and to study alternative structures and forms of communicating outside mass surveillance," !Mediengruppe Bitnik tells FastCo Labs. "How is identity formed in these networks? How is communication and exchange possible in anonymous networks? What forms of trust building arise? How do you trust each other if you don't know to whom you are talking to? How can we as artists examine these questions in a meaningful way?"
     
  8. jjl

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    If I were to repost everything I find all day, you would hide in a bunker. I really have to restrain myself because when you inundate people with frightening news, they tend to stop listening.
     
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  9. jjl

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    something on the lighter side. However, in my neighborhood, it would get your jaw busted.
     
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    Edward Snowden Exposes U.S. Government's Creation of Facebook as Data Collection Tool


    SAN NARCISO, Calif.
    (Bennington Vale Evening Transcript) -- Edward Snowden, the former Booz Allen Hamilton contractor whose work with the National Security Agency (NSA) provided him access to extremely classified U.S. intelligence, shocked the world when he exposed sensitive details about the Obama administration's warrantless wiretapping of private communications between innumerable U.S. citizens with no ties to terrorism. On Wednesday, the self-confessed leaker went on to allege that the U.S. government has also been undertaking enormous hacking operations against targets in China since 2009, part of more than 61,000 similar initiatives worldwide. But Snowden's revelations didn't end there. He rocked the boat again early Thursday morning from his self-imposed exile in Hong Kong when he showed the South China Morning Post evidence that Facebook was conceived as a government data collection tool, and that Mark Zuckerberg doesn't really exist.

    "He's [Zuckerberg] the unemployed nephew of a ranking NSA official, whose aspirations of becoming an actor never materialized...until plans for 'Operation Code Name: Facemash' were drawn up and executed around 2003," Snowden told reporters from various Chinese news agencies, as well as The Washington Post and the British paper Guardian. "Mark Zuckerberg is a fictional character."

    Journalists with those media verified that they had reviewed the documents Snowden provided as proof of his claims. None were willing to offer comments, citing the need for additional time to validate the authenticity of the materials.

    "I suppose I should've seen this all along, though," one editor admitted. "Mark Zuckerberg was almost too cartoonish to be real. His hoodie, his overblown sense of self, his hyperbolic and stereotypical portrayal of someone with Asperger's, the stupid policies, the prodigal financial decisions, like one billion to acquire Instagram, and his weird little dog. Quite ridiculous when you consider it."

    In fact, Snowden explained, the Facebook developers were the real geniuses behind the covert spying program launched in the early days of the Bush administration, following 9/11.

    "Even now, the media are grilling James Clapper over PRISM. But PRISM is the ruse. It's the diversion to keep the focus off Facebook," Snowden said. "Have you heard Clapper's answers to questions? Nobody would be that flip over something so serious...unless it wasn't serious."

    Snowden's references allude to Director of National Intelligence James Clapper's appearance on NBC News this Monday. When questioned about the need for the U.S. government to surreptitiously collect phone records for nearly every American citizen, Clapper quipped, "Well, you have to start someplace."

    The breadth of the phone surveillance program seemed to further complicate the Obama administration's attempts to downplay PRISM, a separate but equally controversial domestic spying program.

    President Obama said people weren't being monitored on the Internet, but PRISM facilitates just that by allowing the NSA to access the data streams of Internet service providers and telecoms, snatching up emails, videos, chats, photographs and other communications between private citizens.

    PRISM was also born during the Bush reign, although it too has become a bastard son to Obama. But programs like PRISM -- and the government's awkward attempts to tamp down the public outcry -- are apparently the big jokes. The red herrings. The MacGuffins used to distract people from spending a careful moment thinking about Facebook.

    "What's better than spending thousands of man hours and resources to gather, mine and then interpret data?" Snowden asked. "I'll tell you: having that data self-reported. That's where Facebook comes in."

    Facebook is the most ingenious spy tool because, Snowden alleges in his leaks, it entices people to make public their most intimate private situations, in granular detail.

    "Pictures, videos, drunken rants, dinner menus, grocery lists, career frustrations, dark family secrets, everything is on display across Facebook," Snowden said. "Data analysts no longer need to sift through information and determine what is meaningful or meaningless, because that's self-identified too by users 'sharing' and 'liking' posts. And if you're not posting enough on Facebook, the peer pressure from friends and the incessant email prompts from Facebook drive you back to this very transparent confessional. All the NSA needs to do is sit back and read the posts."

    According to Snowden, the Facebook team within the NSA humorously refers to itself as the "National Systems Administrator."

    And even Facebook's horrendous lack of privacy controls and ill-communicated changes in user data policies, all clues to the social network's true origins and intent, are met by users with little more than temporary grousing -- which they also post on their Facebook profiles.

    "The whole Verizon phone tapping thing petered out pretty quickly," Snowden observed. "The Internet promised a bigger world of possibilities. Mostly because of ATT's poor coverage; the government couldn't get any useful intelligence with all the dropped calls. Facebook was a brilliant but pathetically obvious solution to a complex problem. And it's still working. And some uneducated, out-of-work actor with a relative in high places gets to keep living the lavish but pretend life of Mark Zuckerberg."

    Snowden laughed pensively and added: "It's German for 'sugar mountain,' you know? The name Zuckerberg. In English, it also sounds a lot like 'Sucker Burg.' Seriously, how are so many Americans not getting this joke?"